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Library Research Tutorial: Adapted from Canvas Course

This Research Guide runs through the same information as the Library Tutorial course in Canvas. Use this guide to quickly access that information without needing to log into Canvas, and use it as a refresher for the main points in the Canvas tutorial.

Direct Plagiarism Example

Original Source Passage

What makes blended learning particularly effective is its ability to facilitate a community of inquiry. Community provides the stabilizing, cohesive influence that balances the open communication and limitless access to information on the Internet. Communities also provide the condition for free and open dialogue, critical debate, negotiation and agreement—the hallmark of higher education. Blended learning has the capabilities to facilitate these conditions and adds an important reflective element with multiple forms of communication to meet specific learning requirements. For example, at the beginning of a course, it may be advantageous to have a face-to-face class to meet and build community. In contrast, discussing a complex issue that requires reflection may be better accomplished through an asynchronous Internet discussion forum.

From page 97 of Garrison, D. R., & Kanuka, H. (2004). Blended learning: Uncovering its transformative potential in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 7(2), 95–105. doi:10.1016/j.iheduc.2004.02.001

Plagiarized Version

Blended learning may support learning communities in ways that face-to-face and online instruction cannot exclusively duplicate. At the beginning of a course, it may be advantageous to have a face-to-face class to meet and build community. In contrast, discussing a complex issue that requires reflection may be better accomplished through an asynchronous Internet discussion forum.

Explanation

In this plagiarism example, the student copied text from the original source, word-for-word. No quotation marks were used, and no in-text citation or reference were used.

Correct Version

Blended learning may support learning communities in ways that face-to-face and online instruction cannot exclusively duplicate. As Garrison and Kanuka (2004) noted, “at the beginning of a course, it may be advantageous to have a face-to-face class to meet and build community. In contrast, discussing a complex issue that requires reflection may be better accomplished through an asynchronous Internet discussion forum” (p. 97).

References: Garrison, D. R., & Kanuka, H. (2004). Blended learning: Uncovering its transformative potential in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 7(2), 95–105. doi:10.1016/j.iheduc.2004.02.001

Explanation 

The correct version uses quotation marks and an APA-formatted parenthetical citation to properly credit the authors of the original source. A complete reference to the original source would also be included at the end of this student’s paper, per APA format.

Paraphrased Plagiarism Example

Original Source Passage

Blended learning is the inspiration of much of the innovation, both pedagogically and technologically, in higher education. By innovation we mean significantly rethinking and redesigning approaches to teaching and learning that fully engage learners. The essential function of blended learning is to extend thinking and discourse over time and space. There is considerable rhetoric in higher education about the importance of engagement, but most institutions’ dominant mode of delivery remains delivering content either through the lecture or self-study course modules. Blended learning is specifically directed to enhancing engagement through the innovative adoption of purposeful online learning activities.

From page 9 of Vaughan, N. D., Cleveland-Innes, M. M., & Garrison, D. R. (2013). Teaching in blended learning environments: Creating and sustaining communities of inquiry. Edmonton: AU Press.

Plagiarized Version

Blended learning is a product of innovation, both in pedagogical and technological terms, to extend the higher learning classroom beyond time and place. In this way, blended learning enhances engagement beyond the face-to-face lecture or self-study lesson units.

Explanation

This content has been largely paraphrased in the student’s own words, but with no in-text citation and no reference crediting the authors of the original source.

Correct Version

Blended learning is a product of innovation, both in pedagogical and technological terms, to extend the higher learning classroom beyond time and place (Vaughan, Cleveland-Innes, & Garrison, 2013). In this way, Vaughan et al. noted, blended learning enhances engagement beyond the face-to-face lecture or self-study lesson units.

References: Vaughan, N. D., Cleveland-Innes, M. M., & Garrison, D. R. (2013). Teaching in blended learning environments: Creating and sustaining communities of inquiry. Edmonton: AU Press.

Explanation

This paraphrased content includes two in-text citations. The first sentence has a parenthetical citation based on APA Publication Manual standards. The sentence that follows includes a shortened citation that appropriately credits Vaughan and his co-authors. It is clear that the student is referencing the same 2013 book, which is fully cited within the References.